Offpeakers

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Category: Hiking

Snowshoeing uphill

Snowshoeing on Hurricane Ridge

The Olympic National Park

Hurricane Ridge is a mountainous region in the Olympic National Park that overlooks Port Angeles and the adjacent Pacific Ocean.  Only 30 minutes from town, the road climbs from sea level to over 5,000 feet (1,600 m) where there is an average of over 400 inches of snow fall a year.

 

J&T

The post in-front of us is normally 10 feet tall. 

Terry by the pole.

Terry standing by the same pole. This was taken when we hiked the ‘hill’ last July.

School Hike

Terry and I jumped at the opportunity to join a school group to spend a day floating over the 70 + inches of snow currently on the trails.  Our fellow adventure seekers are primarily foreign students from China, Malaysia, and Vietnam.  Our fun was enhanced by their enthusiasm to see so much deep snow and unique scenery.

T with student

Terry with SJ, a Peninsula College student from Malaysia.

Snowshoes have been used for 4,000 to 6,000 years.  The equipment we rented is for the same purpose but is definitely from modern times as we had polished aluminum, plastic, and composites shoes rather than the hide, sinew, and wood of the classic models.  Hurricane Ridge turns out to be almost as active in the winter (although only open Friday through Sunday) as it is in the summer.

John holding poles

John about to embark in another adventure!

Chains are often required for the trip, but we had no issues and enjoyed the van ride joking with our fellow students, even though most are younger than our kids.  Terry even knew a few of their songs!  The mountain top visitor center hosts a small ski area with a tow rope, an overflowing parking lot and miles of snowshoeing trails.

Terry snowshoe

On top of the hill, cold but sweaty.

Thankfully snowshoeing is easier to learn than other winter sports (I am pointing my finger at you ice skating and downhill skiing!) and after adjusting a few straps we were plodding and darting across the snow.  Effective traction plates makes climbing steep hillsides a breeze.  You are only limited by your lungs, nerves, or sense of good judgement.

Soccer players snowshoeing

Three members of PC women’s champion soccer team enjoying the day.

Our group started out together up the Hurricane Hill Trail.  Soon we lost sight of our fast contingent of the NWAC Champion Female Soccer team.  During stops for water or photo opportunities we were approached by fluttering Camp Robbers (Gray Jays).

grayjay

A Gray Jay bird.   Photo: wikimedia commons

These beautiful birds were cute enough that I hardly minded that Terry fed them most of my peanut butter sandwich.  A great day was had by all.  On the return trip the quiet bus full of sleeping Peninsula College students was proof positive that although snowshoeing is fun, it is also hard work!

And below is a short video of the trip

Have you ever gone snowshoeing? Did you enjoy it? We’d love to know some of your favorite spots. Thanks for reading!

Smith Rock

Remember the first time you visited an amusement park?  From the parking lot you could see the roller coaster.  It looks enormous and so high you feel excitement and fear at the same time, your palms get sweaty, you could feel your heart beating faster.

Bizarro Roller Coaster in New England (photo c/o travel channel)

Bizarro Roller Coaster in New England (photo c/o travelchannel.com)

It had the foreboding look that make you think you should turn around and go see something else yet it somehow drew you in, you just have to go and be on it! The Offpeakers had a similar experience when we followed the strong recommendations of locals and visited Smith Rock State Park.  Not far from Redmond & Bend, Smith Rock State Park is another reason we think life is great in Oregon.

Before the hike.

Before the hike, the impressive rock (should be a mountain!),  Crooked river & River trail behind us. 

The Smith Rock State Parks amusement park is 641 acres of weirdly eroded volcanic rock with the well named Crooked River twisting around and through it.  Our approach past the parking lot had us bouncing with excitement. Amazing views?  Check.  World class Rock Climbing? Check.  Challenging hiking trails?  Check.  Super volunteers and support staff enhancing the park?  Check.

Entrance sign to the State Park

Entrance to the State Park

This is a popular place as 750,000 day users a year enjoy these rugged outdoors but the myriad of trails, bike paths and cliffs seem to suck us all up so even on a busy Sunday, we never felt crowded. We occasionally shared space with people equally happy to be on the rock.  The $5 day use parking fee is a complete bargain.

We saw climbers even before we found a parking spot! Amazing!

We saw climbers even before we found a parking spot! Amazing!

Approaching the area, walking the rim towards the visitor center, we pin balled around looking over cliffs soaring 600 feet over the river. The rock walls were not only beautiful, but it is liberally peppered with incredibly talented rock climbers.  Smith Rock is generally considered the birthplace of modern American rock climbing, and it continues to be a destination and class room for those strong adventurous people that do not need (nor want) a path to get to the top of mountain.

Awesome volunteers at the Visitor Center. If you visit make sure you stop.

Jerry from the Welcome Center. If you visit make sure you stop.

Not all Visitor Centers are helpful, but Smith Rock’s maps, advice, cold water, and volunteers were all terrific.  The Offpeakers were fortunate to meet Jerry, who just may be Oregon’s number one advocate.  Jerry gave us super information on the best hiking trails, views, and where we could hopefully see beavers and/or otters.  We got even more information on the Oregon coast and history of the Brookings district, including interesting background on World War II Japanese incursions in the area.

The uphill trail is visible on Terry's right side

The uphill zigzag trail is visible by Terry’s right shoulder.  Such a fun hike!

Our fun conversation was cut a little short because we could not wait to get on the switchback trails that work their way up Misery Ridge to work our way up, on and around this intimidating outcropping.

Whew! We quickly made it passed the shoot

Whew! We quickly made it passed the Chute and up the Misery, we pity those below us! Hahaha!

From the Visitor Center we dropped down using the The Chute trail to take us down to river level.  Crossing Crooked River we watched people working their way up the steep initial portion of the trail.

Such beauty at every angle! We stop for a breather and to take the scenery in.

Such beauty at every angle! We stop for a breather often to enjoy the scenery in.

Soon we were on their heels, enjoying the fun of spectacular scenery that you have earned through hard labor.  The going was slow and steady with a steep elevation climb.

The group of students in front of us.

The group of fun and friendly students in front of us.

As sometimes happens on these outings, we ended up getting partnered with some outgoing pharmacy students taking a break from Pacific University.  I felt as if we were colleagues on this and peers, but at the top we were referred to affectionately as their “trail parents”.

Our trail "kids'

T with our trail “kids’

If I needed another reminder of our age besides my heaving chest and heavy feet, this was it.  The Misery Ridge trail loop is almost 6 miles long as it weaves up, behind, over and down the main outcropping.

The trail is so beautiful we didn't mind the hard climb!

The trail is so beautiful we didn’t mind the hard climb!

We loved every sweaty dusty step.  The views change, but remain consistently beautiful.  Yes it is a long ways down, but fear kept us careful even as we scanned around to see natural beauty, climbers, and distant snow clad mountains on this glorious day.

You can see Monkey Face in front of Terry

You can see Monkey Face in front of Terry

At the back we see the aptly named Monkey Face, which is an outcropping that bears an amazing resemblance to Curious George except you need to scale a 350 foot column to dance on his head.

On our way down

On our way down

Continuing down we intersect Mesa Verde and River trails.  Down here have close views of the climbers doing very good impersonations of Spiderman.

Can you spot the spider like humans on the cliff face?

Can you spot the spider like humans on the cliff face?

Men and women looked tiny as they worked their way up cliffs that have visible white marks from powder used to dry sweaty hands.

These 2 are on a "beginner" cliff! Looks scary to me!

These two are on a “beginner” cliff! doesn’t look like beginner stuff to us!

Across the river, beginner classes were taking place on cliffs that were still daunting even though they were in the shadows of their much bigger brothers.

There is no bad view on this site?

There is no bad view on Smith Rock only happy Offpeakers!

Smith Rock is a great place to feel the positive energy of the earth and people working together.  Everyone was in excited moods, pushing hard to see and do more.  What a fun experience to work hard yet feel energized at the same time.

what a beautiful place

What a beautiful place, we can’t wait to go back!

While they could have probably come up with a more inspirational name, we fail to imagine a better experience. This is our favorite sight in all of Oregon!  What’s yours?  Please share your favorite spot in Oregon or a time that you were reminded that you have gotten older.  Thank you for traveling with the Offpeakers!

 

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